‘Well, if your website has a Revenue Per Visit of 1.2 USD, your market research showed that you can target customers who are 3.5 times more likely to buy and spend the samevusing a Pay Per Click campaign, assuming your 20% percent profit margin stays constant, a 0.55 USD cost per click is good enough’
— A numerically able candidate

These fact based conclusions are essential to impress customers and give estimates quickly. Let us go through this example.

Revenue per visit 1.2 USD
Targeted revenue per visit= 1.2*3.5=4.2 USD
Profit per visit 4.2*0.2=0.84 USD

Hence if a visit costs 0.55 USD there will be a new profit of 0.29 USD which is significant for a website with thousand of daily visits.
The calculations above are quite simple right? Anyone could do them. However, as a consultant, you need to be able to think about the problem and perform the calculations as you speak, in essentially no time.

HOW to beat texas instruments

We put together all the tricks you can possibly imagine to impress anyone with your calculation speed. If you read these and practice using our Plain Number package, with more than 7000 calculations, no one will ever stop you.

Addition

It is usually better to add numbers in two steps instead of one, rounding the first to the closest hundreth and subtracting the added number to the second. For example,

268 + 64 = (268 + 32) + (64 - 32) = 300 + 32 = 332.

In general, you can add what comes easy to you and then add the rest.
So let’s see another example:

2074 + 254 = 2100 + (254 - 26) = 2100 + 228 = 2328.

This trick may not work for everyone but it is useful to know.


On the same line, when dealing with large numbers it is often easier to add a single digit at a time instead of trying to add the whole number.
Say 478+529 becomes

478+500=478+500+20+9
978+20+9
998+9=1007

It is often easier to first subtract 5 and then add 10 when adding 5 to a number whose last digit is greater than 5.
For example,

18 + 5 = 23.

18- 5 = 13; 13+ 10 = 23.

When adding a long list of numbers, estimate the average of the list ( the close the average, the easier it gets), then just add the difference of each number and the average. Finally, simply multiply the average by the number of addends and add the result of the previous sum. Even though it sounds tedious and confusing, the following example shows that the method is very efficient.

So assume we need to compute the sum of 12 numbers:

77 + 74 + 94 + 89 + 85 + 70 + 84 + 72 + 77 + 94 + 78 + 85.

Assume that the average is 80.
If we add all the differences we get

-3-6+14+9+5-10+4-8-3+14-2+5


The two 5s cancel out with the 10, -3-6 and +9 cancel out as well and we are left with

14+4-8-3+14-2=19


So

80*12=80*10+80*2=800+160=960
960+19=979

SUBTRACTION 

It is often easier to first subtract 10 and then add 5 when subtracting 5 to number whose last digit is less than 5.
For example,

23 - 5 = 18.

18- 5 = 13; 13+ 10 = 23.

It is usually better to subtract  numbers in two steps instead of one, rounding the first to the closest hundreth for instance and subtracting the added number to the second. For example,

268 -85 = (268 - 68) - (85 - 68) = 200-17= 183. 

Just subtract what is obvious first and then the rest.
So let’s see another example:

2074 - 254 = 2000 - (254 - 74) = 2000 + 180 = 1820.

Multiplication 

While for addition and subtraction are fairly straightforward even without tricks, knowing the following tricks can make a huge difference to your calculation speed for multiplication and division


When multiplying by 5, multiply by 10 and then divide by 2.
For example,

247×5 = 2470/2 = 1235.

When multiplying by 4, multiply the number twice by two.
For example

372×4 = 744×2 = 1488.

When multiplying by 8, multiply the number three times by two.
For example

376×8 = 752×4 = 1504*2=3008.

When multiplying by 50, multiply by 100 and divide by 2. Use operations with 4 instead.
For example,

824×50 = 82400/2 = 41200.

When multiplying by 25, multiply by 100 and divide by 4.
For example,

27×25 = 2700/4 = 1350/2 = 675.

When multiplying a big number by a small one, multiply each digit and then add them up.
For example

743*7=700*7+40*7+3*7=4900+280+21=5201

If you are multiplying a 2 digit number by 11, just write the sum of its digits between its digits. If the sum is greater than 10, carry the 1 over to the left. For example, 63×11 = 693 since 6 + 3 = 9. 76×11 = 836 since 7 + 6 = 13.


When multiplying by 9, multiply by 10 instead, and then subtract the other number. For example,
38×9 = 380 - 38 = 342.


Another way of multiplying numbers by 9 is the following. 
For any 1 digit number a
9*a=bc ( where bc is not the product b*c but just the two digits)
where b=a-1 and c=9-b
So if we have for instance
9*7= (7-1)*(9-7+1)=63
Similarly, for a 2-digit a:

bc = 100b + c


= 100(a - 1) + (99 - (a - 1))


= 100a - 100 + 100 - a


= 99a.

As an example,

543×999

= 1000×542 + (999 - 542)


= 542457.


This trick may or may not speed up the multiplication depending on the numbers. If two numbers are not too far apart and it is easy to find their average, the following formula can be applied

a*b=((a+b)/2)^2-((a-b)/2)^2


Say that we have 32 and 36, (a+b)/2=34 and (a-b)/2=2 so 34^2-2^2=1152. Finding squares may not be obvious but have a look at the  following section on squaring numbers and it will all make sense.

Division

When dividing by 5, multiply by 2 and then divide by 10.
For example

247/5 = 494/10 = 49.4.

When dividing by 4, divide by 2 twice.
For example,

376/4 = 188/2 = 94.

When dividing by 8, divide by 2 three times.
For example,
376/8 = 188/4 = 94/2=47.


When dividing by 25, divide by 100 and multiply by 4.
For example,

3000/25 = 3000/100 = 30*4 = 120.

When dividing by 25, divide by 100 and multiply by 4.
For example,

875/125 = 875*8 = 1750*4 = 3500*2 = 7000/1000=7

SQUARES

It is a good idea to memorise the first 25 squares. Even though it looks a lot, you know the first 10 for sure. Then 11 and 20 are easy. By practicing you will soon remember the others as well.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
1 4 9 16 25 36 49 64 81 100 121 144 169 196 225 256 289 324 361 400 441 484 529 576 625

A quick and easy way to find the square of any two digits number ab is to :
add b to ab and get b+ab. Then square b and append the square to b+ab. If the square of the number is greater than 10, carry the one over to the left.  Let’s see how it works with 14.
Find 14+4=18. Then 4²=16. So appending the last digit and adding the previous one to 18 we get 196.

There is also an advanced technique to calculate squares for 26 to 50 but it is quite challenging to do mentally. We will go through it as it could still become useful.
If A is a square between 26 and 50, Subtract 25 from A to get x. Subtract x from 25 to get, say, a. Then A² = a² + 100x. For example, if A = 28, then x = 3 and a = 22.  Hence

28² = 22² + 100*3 = 784

Squares of numbers from 51 through 99

If A is between 50 and 100, then A = 50 + x. Compute a = 50 - x. Then A² = a² + 200x. For example,
63² = 37² + 200×13 = 1369 + 2600 = 3969.

ANY square

In order to find any square, we need to apply another formula which is again given without proof. To find the square of any number (a), find a number close to it whose square can be found relatively easily(b).
Then find the difference between the two numbers (a-b) and subtract the difference from a hence a-(b-a). Then the square of the number can be found using the following formula:

b*(a-(b-a))+(a-b)^2

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